Zika birth defects

zika-mobilization-resources-en

by Jaime Castillo

ABSTRACT

The virus was identified in 1947 for the first time in Uganda. It was discovered when a study was carried out on the transmission of yellow fever in the jungle. Its transmission is through the bite of infected mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. These tend to sting during the day, especially at dawn and dusk, and are the same that transmit dengue. This is a very serious illness that affects adults and babies. The main zika birth defects are: microcephaly, Congenital Zika Syndrome, Severe microcephaly where the skull has partially collapsed, Decreased brain tissue with a specific pattern of brain damage, Damage to the back of the eye, Joints with limited range of motion, such as clubfoot and also affects Future Pregnancies.

Key words: zika, transmission, mosquitoes, defects, syndrome, babies.

I. INTRODUCTION

The zika virus was first identified in Macacos Uganda, 1947. it is transmitted to people mainly through the bite of infected mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. Aedes mosquitoes usually sting during the day, especially at dawn and dusk, and they are the same ones that transmit dengue, chikungunya fever and yellow fever.

Sexual transmission is also possible, and other modes of transmission, such as blood transfusions, are being investigated. And it is a very serious disease that affects adults and babies. In this essay detail the Zika birth defects.

II. BODY

Zika and microcephaly

Graphic of doctor with a pregnant woman

Microcephaly is a birth defect where a baby’s head is smaller than expected when compared to babies of the same sex and age. Babies with microcephaly often have smaller brains that might not have developed properly.

Zika virus infection during pregnancy is a cause of microcephaly. During pregnancy, a baby’s head grows because the baby’s brain grows. Microcephaly can occur because a baby’s brain has not developed properly during pregnancy or has stopped growing after birth.

Congenital Zika Syndrome

Congenital Zika syndrome is a pattern of birth defects found among fetuses and babies infected with Zika virus during pregnancy. Congenital Zika syndrome is described by the following five features:

  • Severe microcephaly where the skull has partially collapsed
  • Decreased brain tissue with a specific pattern of brain damage
  • Damage to the back of the eye
  • Joints with limited range of motion, such as clubfoot
  • Too much muscle tone restricting body movement soon after birth

Not all babies born with congenital Zika infection will have all of these problems. Some infants with congenital Zika virus infection who do not have microcephaly at birth may later experience slowed head growth and develop postnatal microcephaly. Scientists continue to study how Zika virus affects mothers and their children to better understand the full range of potential health problems that Zika virus infection during pregnancy may cause.

Future Pregnancies

Based on the available evidence, we think that Zika virus infection in a woman who is not pregnant would not pose a risk for birth defects in future pregnancies after the virus has cleared from her blood. From what we know about similar infections, once a person has been infected with Zika virus, he or she is likely to be protected from a future Zika infection.

CDC. (2017).

III. CONCLUSION

In future pregnancies the zika with the passage of time will disappear. This is something favorable for medicine. Zika birth defects are a deadly disease for newborns, your transmission is by mosquito bite and sexual transmission. If a baby has zika, treat it as fast as possible. A Zika birth defects is microcephaly, is the size of the baby’s head smaller than normal. Birth defects of the zika are very dangerous, but an aid to cure the zika would be that over time future pregnancies will not be born with this disease.

 

REFERENCES

 

Cdc.gov. (2017). Facts about Microcephaly | Birth Defects | NCBDDD | CDC. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/microcephaly.html [Accessed 20 Jan. 2017].

 

(CDC. (2017). Zika Virus. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/zika/healtheffects/birth_defects.html)

Park, A. (2017). Zika Virus Birth Defects Don’t Stop at Microcephaly. [online] TIME.com. Available at: http://time.com/4516531/zika-virus-birth-defects-microcephaly/.

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